So You Didn’t Get to Go to AWP

BREVITY's Nonfiction Blog

Picture of Bookfair It’ll be just like this.

Another year of AWP has drawn to a close, and countless editors, writers and journal staffers are heading back to their home institutions with swag bags, connections and newly autographed books.

Not everyone got to go to AWP, and I just want to say that’s OK. We’re all in this together. In case, like me, you were at home watching the literary world scroll by on social media, here’s what you can do to recreate the AWP experience:

First, stock up on wine. You’re going to need a lot of it. Start with half a plastic cup of unfortunately-sharp white as you pull from your shelves every literary journal, small-press book, and poetry collection you own. Arrange the books on your dining or coffee table in a pleasing display. Rearrange three times. Settle on the original arrangement–it should be about the work.

Find the last…

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The Unbearable Ironies of Libraries in Wartime

Flavorwire

Yesterday we learned from Yahoo News! that ISIS has used improvised explosive devices to destroy several historic landmarks in the Iraqi city of Mosul, including the Mosul University Theater, the Church of Mary the Virgin, and the Mosul Public Library. In the case of the library, which is now offline, ISIS destroyed more than 8,000 items from a collection that includes “manuscripts from the eighteenth century, Syriac books printed in Iraq’s first printing house in the nineteenth century, books from the Ottoman era, Iraqi newspapers from the early twentieth century and some old antiques like an astrolabe and sand glass used by ancient Arabs.”

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Oscar Wilde in Prison

A R T L▼R K

51chT0vHKVLOn the 19th of May 1897, Irish writer Oscar Wilde was released from prison after serving a two year  sentence for criminal sodomy and “gross indecency”. He had to go through hard labor and major deprivation, a very problematic situation for a hedonist accustomed to his creature comforts. His experiences in prison were the basis for his last work, The Ballad of Reading Gaol(1898).

In a bid to understand the reasoning behind Wilde’s imprisonment, Neil McKenna’sThe Secret Life of Oscar Wilde (2003) systematically investigated all available evidence about Wilde’s amorous liaisons, his lifelong erotic attraction to men and his subsequent support of Uranianism. The latter was a 19th-century term which referred to the actions of a person of a third sex, neither entirely male, nor female, someone with “a female psyche in a male body” who is sexually attracted to men, later extended as a definition…

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2014 Lamar York Prize Winners and Finalists in Fiction and Nonfiction

The Hooch: News & Events

Thank you to all entrants in the Lamar York Prizes for Fiction and Nonfiction for sending us your best work. This year the competition was the toughest yet! On the task of selecting favorites (always subjective, of course), we were honored to consider so many fine submissions and to hand our judges such a gratifying challenge. We encourage all of our entrants to keep writing and to keep reading literary journals like ours. All entrants receive a subscription, and we hope they are encouraged by their fellow writers. Congratulations to our winners and finalists, and special thanks to all of the writers who submitted!

2014 Lamar York Prize Winners and Finalists

Winner in Fiction
“The Cartographers,” Alexander Weinstein

Alexander Weinstein Photo

Winner in Nonfiction
“Basic Composition,” Jeremy Collins

Jeremy Collins

 

Finalists in Fiction
“Beautiful Men Die This Way,” Ryan Habermeyer
“Biggest Snake in the Woods,” John Blair
“Bristol, Boy,” Scott Winokur
“A Burial, Again,”…

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Changing Face of Book Publishing: Indie Publishers Partner with Amazon

Parallel Universe

We Say We Want a Revolution

by G G Collins  (Copyright 2013)

There is a revolution going on and it’s changing the world of book publishing. Indie publishers are uniting and uploading their books to the Amazon machine. The days of a half-dozen huge New York book publishers making all the decisions on what the public will read is coming to an end. What has led us to this threshold? Of course technology is part of it, but traditional publishers are partly to blame. Is it a good change or not? Probably both, but like other revolutions, it is a sea change, a wave that cannot be turned back.

Putting Aside Perceptions

The first day I walked into a book publisher as a new employee, I thought that writers (authors after you write a book) would be revered. I would soon know differently as one after another, my beliefs would…

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